SEND

Telford & Wrekin Local Offer

SEND Guidance

Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) Guidance

This guidance sets out our response to the SEND reforms outlined in the Code of Practice 2015 to ensure that the best possible outcomes for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities can be achieved.

Telford and Wrekin Council are working in partnership with all education, health and social care agencies and settings to ensure that children and young people with SEND remain at the heart of policies and practice. This guidance will provide key information to all educational settings in Telford and Wrekin to enable them to fulfil their responsibilities towards children and young people with SEND.

Introduction

An information guide for professionals working with children and young people (0-25) in Telford and Wrekin with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities March 2016. To be reviewed in September 2016

Acknowledgements

This guidance document has been prepared with contributions from a wide range of people, including:

Julie Bebb SENCO - Old Park Primary School
Natalie Bevan CSS Senior Practitioner, Communication & Engagement
Mary Braund CSS SEND Lead Officer, Lakeside
Sue Burrell CSS SEND Lead Officer, Early Years
Andy Cooke Service Delivery Manager Corporate Parenting and Inclusion 
Nicola Davis Deputy Head Teacher, The Bridge School
Julie Edmonds SENDirect Project Officer & Personalisation Commissioning
Cerys Empson New College Learning Support Manager
Cathy Hobbs Service Delivery Specialist for Vulnerable Learners
Ceri Hurst SENCO - St Georges Primary
Karen Levell Group Manager, Children's Specialist Services
Tammy Lockley Deputy Head & SENCO - Millbrook Primary
Lisa Lyon Head Teacher, Mount Gilbert School
Bev Porter Team Leader/Senior Advisory Teacher for SLCN
Alison Prosser SENCO - Phoenix Academy
Helen Pugh SENCO - Windmill Primary
Loren Reeve SENCO - Director of Specialist Provision HLC
Denise Rock SENCO - Redhill Primary School
Kerry Ruston SEND Officer, Hadley
Lisa Seymour Early Years & Childcare Consultant Team Leader
Joy Simpson CSS SEND Transfer Manager
Tim Smart Careers Team Leader, Future Focus
Gaynor Styles Assistant Principal / Inclusion and SEND. WWAcademy
Hazel Waterhouse SENCO - Short Wood Primary
Dawn Walker SENCO - Charlton School
Fionnuala Williams TCAT Learning Support Manager

General Information

In Telford and Wrekin we want to ensure that children and young people with special education needs and/or disabilities (SEND) achieve good outcomes and receive a high quality education.

Inclusion of people with special educational needs and disabilities in society is everyone’s concern and not just something the Special Educational Needs Coordinator (SENCO) can achieve alone. Effective SEND coordination is the commitment to ensure that everyone has the right to achieve and enjoy life. Educational experience is valuable as it builds resilience and is an enabling factor for later life.

This guidance sets out Telford and Wrekin’s response to the SEND reforms outlined in the Code of Practice 2015 to ensure that the best possible outcomes for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities can be achieved. Telford and Wrekin Council are working in partnership with all education, health and social care agencies and settings to ensure that children and young people with SEND remain at the heart of policies and practice. This guidance will provide key information to all educational settings in Telford and Wrekin to enable them to fulfil their responsibilities towards children and young people with SEND. Telford and Wrekin Council has an inclusive education approach and is committed to supporting all early years, schools and post 16 settings in following all legislative requirements. This guidance reflects national, regional and local priorities and commitments to children and young people with SEND.

This guidance should be read in conjunction with the SEND Code of Practice (January 2015) which is underpinned by the principles in part 3 of the Children and Families Act 2014.

Implications of Code of Practice

SEND Guidance 1

Early Help - Integrated Pathway - Person Centred Approach

The Children and Families Act 2014 requires changes to current practice to enable improved outcomes for children and young people 0-25 years with special educational needs and/or disabilities by providing integrated and outcome focused interventions from across education, health and social care.

In Telford and Wrekin we are working towards bringing together our processes for early intervention and targeted support into a single integrated pathway for all children with additional needs. To achieve this holistic and integrated approach we will build on what we do well, recognise where we can improve and make the changes that children, young people and parents/carers want.

This will result in: • A reduction in the amount and variety of assessments and plans that lead to confusion. • A reduction in the multiple times families are asked for the same information across agencies. • Feeling listened to and enabled to be part of the solution. • A joined up approach that helps the ‘whole’ child or young person now and into the future. • A more transparent and meaningful approach to how we identify needs early and allocate resources to meet outcomes.

What will change?

The legislation and Code of Practice seeks cultural change, across the board, towards a person-centred outcome-focused and future focused planning for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities. These changes affect both what we do and how we do it with the requirement that both elements are clearly published and available via the local offer. Some specific changes are that:

• School Action and School Action + will be replaced with one new category called SEN Support across all stages of education.
• Statements of special educational needs will be gradually replaced by Education, Health and Care Plans.
• The age range for eligibility for Education, Health and Care plans is now extended to cover 0-25 years.
• The timescale from receipt by the local authority of the request for the statutory assessment to the production of an integrated Education, Health and Care Plan is 20 weeks, reduced from the previous process of 26 weeks for a statement of special educational needs.

The Early Help approach

Early identification of additional needs is likely to happen in the universal sector, i.e. services that are available to everyone in the community. The people involved will be those practitioners in universal services, such as:

• Early Years education, Children’s Centres, Schools, Colleges.
• Universal health services such as Health Visitors, School Nursing, paediatricians and doctors.
• Voluntary and independent provision of out of school and holiday activities.

This guidance is provided to help you to:

• navigate the Early Help integrated pathway.
• access the tools to support early identification of additional needs.
• support planning and engaging the appropriate support as early as possible. This guidance is based on the following principles:
• Every person is an individual with their own preferences, aspirations and needs.
• Telford and Wrekin Council and associated organisations support all children who have additional needs including special educational needs and disabilities to be included in their communities and to achieve their potential.
• Telford and Wrekin Council and associated organisations support children, families and young people to have choice and control in decisions that affect them.
• Wherever possible, Telford and Wrekin Council and associated organisations will support children and young people with additional needs to enjoy the same range of experiences and opportunities and in the same places, as children and young people with no additional needs.
• Education, health and care professionals will work together with families to build an integrated single plan for children with additional needs focused on achieving positive outcomes.

Person centred approach

A person centred approach is based on the principle that we are all individuals with our own unique experiences, preferences, aspirations and motivators. A person centred approach is essential to ensure children and young people with additional needs and their families feel listened to and have choice and control over decisions made about them. A person centred Early Help approach recognises the value of input from those who know the child or young person best. The significance of good working relationships and consistent communication are vital components in making the best use of resources to help children and young people realise their full potential.

Person Centred Principles on which the SEND reforms are based:

• The views, wishes and feelings of the child or young person must be taken into account.
• Parent/carers views must be listened to and taken into account
• The child or young person, and their parents/carers will be given the opportunity to fully participate in decision making • The child or young person and their parents/carers must be provided with the necessary information and support to fully participate in decision making
• The child or young person and their parents/carers must be supported to help the child or young person effectively prepare for adulthood.

The fundamental nature of being person centred is enabling the active participation of children, young people and their families to support them in achieving their aspirations. The views of children, young people and their families should be sought at all stages of the process of identifying and planning, in order to meet their additional needs.

The child / young person is given regular opportunities to reflect on their support needs and provision.

Schools should think about how they will create a welcoming environment and how they will prepare children and young people to reach their goals. This should include ongoing support for maintaining children, young people and parents/carers knowledge about services and resources available so they can be fully informed when making future plans. All schools should build on their established good practice to ensure they are person centred in their approach to supporting children and young people with additional needs.

Telford and Wrekin Local Offer

Under the Children and Families Act 2014 every Local Authority must have published a local offer for SEN and Disability (SEND) by September 2014.

Telford and Wrekin local offer can be found at:

www.telfordsend.org.uk

The Local Offer is a statutory requirement on local authorities to develop and publish information - setting out the support they expect to be available for all children and young people with SEND. Schools are subject to a statutory duty to co-operate with their local authority in the development of the Local Offer.

Providers of relevant early years education are also required to cooperate with the Local Authority in relation to the Local Offer. The Local Authority should engage with the providers of relevant early years education particularly those in receipt of early years funding.

The SEN Information Report provides a starting point for the school’s on-going engagement in the development of the Local Offer. But it is not the end point. In Telford and Wrekin schools may have developed an easily accessible School Offer so that children and young people with SEN and disabilities and their families can have access to information about the school’s SEN provision. Some schools may have used their SEN Information report to highlight this information. Some schools may choose to do both.

Further information on the requirements of schools and colleges can be found in the Special Educational Needs Code of Practice January 2015, chapter 4; The Local Offer.

SEN Information Report

All schools and education providers, including special schools, are required to publish an SEN Information Report from 1 September 2014. The Children and Families Act 2014 (section 69) along with the SEND Code of Practice January 2015 sets out a requirement for providers, schools and colleges to publish their SEND provision in an SEN Information Report.

This should be a live document updated annually and with any changes to the information occurring during the year to be updated as soon as possible.

The statutory requirement is on the school governing body or proprietors to produce, and keep under review, the SEN Information Report.

The production and subsequent reviews of the report should be undertaken in partnership with relevant groups who have contributions to make. In particular, in keeping with the cultural changes in the Children and Families Act 2014 it is expected that representative groups of parents, children and young people would co-produce the report with the school, and be involved in reviewing it.

The information should be accessible to young people and parents / carers and be set out in clear and straightforward language.

The information required is set out in the Special Educational Needs and Disability Regulations 2014 (Schedule 1 reg. 51) and reiterated in the SEND Code of Practice 2015 (Para. 6.79)

• the kinds of special educational needs that are provided for

• policies for identifying children and young people with SEND and assessing their needs, including the name and contact details of the SENCO

• arrangements for consulting parents/carers of children with SEND and involving them in their child’s education

• arrangements for consulting young people with SEND and involving them in their education

• arrangements for assessing and reviewing children and young people’s progress towards mutually agreed outcomes, including the opportunities available to work with parents / carers and young people as part of this assessment and review

• arrangements for supporting children and young people in moving between phases of education and in preparing for adulthood. As young people prepare for adulthood outcomes should reflect their ambitions, which could include higher education, employment, independent living and participation in society

• the approach to teaching children and young people with SEND

• how adaptations are made to the curriculum and the learning environment of children and young people with SEND

• the expertise and training of staff to support children and young people with SEND, including how specialist expertise will be secured

• evaluating the effectiveness of the provision made for children and young people with SEND

• how children and young people with SEND are enabled to engage in activities available with children and young people in the school who do not have SEND

• support for improving emotional and social development. This should include extra pastoral support arrangements for listening to the views of children and young people with SEND and measures to prevent bullying.

The SEN Information Report and policy will be individual to the setting but examples can be found online through websites such as The Key. The SEN Information Report should be:

• Published on school or provider’s own website

The SEND Code of Practice 2015 makes it clear that schools or providers must link from their information to Telford and Wrekin’s Local Offer:

Telford and Wrekin’s Local Offer -  www.telfordsend.org.uk

SEN Policy

The statutory requirement on schools or providers to publish information about the implementation of their SEN Policy means that they must have one.

A school’s SEN policy provides the vision, values and broader aims of the school’s SEND arrangements.

Broadly speaking a policy can be defined as ‘an expected principle and course of action adopted by an organisation in relation to a specific area'. The DfE in February 2014 published advice on the policies and documents that governing bodies and proprietors of schools are required to have by law i.e. statutory policies.

Policies should be based on a shared understanding of:

• Why the school exists (its mission)
• What it believes to be right (its values)
• What it is trying to achieve (its vision)
• What it is going to do to make this a reality (its aims)
• The underpinning rules that will guide action (principles)
• The practicalities of implementation (policies and procedures)

In effect a policy should include:

• Status – statutory, expected or recommended
• Purpose – a brief statement referring to relevant local guidelines, national regulations and the school’s own values, vision and aims
• Consultation – list of groups, individuals and documents consulted. This is useful when the policy needs revising
• Cross-references to other documents – a more coherent approach can be achieved by linking with other policies
• Roles and responsibilities of head teacher, staff and governors – the core and most detailed part of the policy
• Monitoring and evaluation arrangements – what evidence would demonstrate success and how and when it will be brought to the attention of the governing body
• Date established by governing body
• Date for review
• Signature of Chair of Governors (or Chair of Committee)

This information has been drawn from the associated statutory documents, SEND Code of Practice 2015 and the DfE Fact sheet for schools on the Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) reforms. Full copies of these are available on the DfE website. SEND Code of Practice

The Role of the Special Educational Needs Coordinator (SENCO)

The provision of high quality teaching for children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities is not a matter for the Special Educational Needs Coordinator (SENCO) alone; all teachers are teachers of children with additional educational needs. However, each mainstream school (including academies and free schools) is required to have a nominated SENCO who must be a qualified teacher. (Para 6.85 SEND CoP)

All staff and parents must know who the nominated SENCO is. The importance of this challenging and highly rewarding role in schools has been reiterated in the January 2015 SEN Code of Practice and the Children and Families Act of 2014. Whilst the day to day role will reflect the phase, type and size of school, the key features are:

• determines with Head teacher and Governing Body the strategic development of SEN policy and provision;
• responsibility for overseeing the day to day operation (and periodic review) of the school’s SEND policy and provision
• coordinating, tracking progress and evaluating the impact of the provision being made for pupils with SEND;
• ensuring the full inclusion of SEND pupils within the school community and their access to the school’s curriculum, facilities and extra-curricular activities;
• providing professional guidance to colleagues/liaising with and advising other teachers
• the effective deployment and performance management of learning support staff
• maintaining detailed records of the provision made for children and young people with SEND
• working closely with parents/ carers and specialists
• liaising with parents / carers and contributing to the professional development of staff
• advising and liaising with external agencies deploying the SEN budget and reporting on how it is spent
• reporting on the progress of children and young people with SEND
• working with the Head teacher and Governing Body to meet the Equality Act 2010

The Code of Practice envisages that the SENCO will provide professional guidance to colleagues with the aim of securing high quality teaching of pupils with SEN and that they will therefore lead teaching and learning and the coordination of provision for pupils with SEN in their school. It is recommended that SENCOs are members of the school’s Senior Leadership Team. Best practice and dedicated time is involved in SEN coordination and access to administrative support is essential to enable the SENCO to focus on the core, and specialist, aspects of the role.

In 2009 The Education (Special Educational Needs Coordinators) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2009 made it a legal requirement that every new SENCO in a mainstream school gain the Masters level National Award for Special Educational Needs Co-ordination within 3 years of taking up the post. The Education (Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator) (England) Regulations 2014 further prescribes the qualifications and experience the nominated SENCO must hold.

The Education (Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator) (England) Regulations 2014 and learning outcomes can be viewed here

Early Years

Maintained nursery schools must have a qualified teacher designated as responsible for SEN provision.

Early years: Guide to the 0-25 SEND Code of Practice – Advice for early years providers that are funded by the Local Authority 2014 Sept.

Early_Years_Guide_to_SEND_Code_of_Practice

This individual should also have the prescribed qualification for SEN Co-ordination or relevant experience.

The EYFS framework requires other early years providers to have arrangements in place for meeting children’s SEN. Those in group provision are expected to identify a SENCO. Telford and Wrekin employ a team of Early Years Qualified teachers to provide advice and guidance to all early years settings, nursery classes and reception classes.

EYFS_framework

Childminders are encouraged to identify a person to act as SENCO and childminders who are registered with a childminder agency or who are part of a network may wish to share that role between them. Telford and Wrekin have a nominated SENCO as part of the Talking Childcare network.

Ofsted will be expecting to see: - ‘the impact of the involvement of the special educational needs co-ordinator (SENCO) and/or other partners where there are concerns about a child’s development and learning.’ (Early Years inspection handbook, Ofsted, 2015)

Early_years_inspection_handbook

Post – 16

FE Colleges should ensure there is a named person with oversight of SEN provision to coordinate support – similar to the role of a SENCO in schools. This will usually be Learning Support Managers.

FE_Implementation_Pack

The Role of the Special Needs Governor

Governing Bodies have a strong focus on three core strategic functions:

• Ensuring clarity of vision, ethos and strategic direction;
• Holding the Head Teacher to account for the education performance of the school and its’ pupils; and overseeing the financial performance of the schools and making sure its’ money is well spent.
• Involved every 3 years in supporting the SENCO to update the SEN policy.

The DfE’s Handbook for Governors was updated in January 2014 and can be viewed here:

Governors-handbook

There should be a nominated link Governor, or Governors, for SEND, who plays a key role in the strategic leadership and development of SEND provision, offering appropriate support and challenge in relation to the above areas with a specific focus on SEND.

The SEND Governor will inform the Governing Body on all aspects of SEND in the school to ensure that SEND work is valued and well-supported in the school.

SEND Governors will need to carry out these responsibilities in a number of ways:
• informing themselves about SEND systems and practices in school through meetings.
• review the schools SEND policy with the Head Teacher
• ensuring that the progress of learners with SEND is closely monitored through reviewing and understanding internal and external data
• understanding how the notional (delegated) SEND budget is used and ensuring that wider financial decisions do not adversely impact on the support for pupils with SEND
• understanding the national and local context of SEND support
• using their school visits to inform themselves about the work the SENCO is leading
• that the views of pupils and parents /carers, in relation to the SEND provision that is being made, are sought
• building a trusting and supportive relationship with their SENCO
• putting together an annual SEND Information Report with input from SENCO and the Governing Body Committee (if relevant) which is published on the website from September 2014 and updated annually
• ensure the schools has engaged with the local authority in the development of the local offer and their process for transferring from statements to EHC Plans
• consider how the SENCO fits into the strategic management of the school
• ensure staff are trained and ready to deliver the changes
• ensure the Head teacher has arrangements in place to review pupils who were at SEN Support and is engaging the child/young person and parents/carers in decision making
• ensure the Head teacher has reviewed how the school supports pupils with their transition to post 16 education and preparing for adult life
• ensure the Head Teacher has arrangements in place to support pupils with medical conditions.

As part of this role, the SENCO and the SEN Governor may meet periodically, alongside the more formal reporting systems that will be in place. This will enable the SENCO to update the SEN Governor on the progress of children and young people with SEN and how they are being supported, along with the priorities for whole school development that the SENCO may be identified.

The SEN Governor’s interest should not be around the arrangements that are in place for individual pupils, but rather how the cohort is being supported as a whole.

The Graduated Response

The inclusion of people with Special Education Needs and Disabilities in society is everyone’s concern and in education settings the Special Educational Needs Coordinator (SENCO) is not able to achieve this alone.

There has to be a commitment from a range of professionals and services to ensure that the achievement and quality of provisions are delivered to give every child /young person a quality educational experience which builds resilience and preparation for adulthood.

This guidance booklet sets out T&W’s response to the SEND reforms outlined in the Code of Practice so that the best possible outcomes for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities can be achieved.

Telford and Wrekin is committed to working in partnership with all education, health and social care agencies and settings to ensure that the needs of children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities remain the central focus of policies and practice.

Whilst it is necessary to adopt consistent and inclusive practice, it is recognised that each child / young person with whom you work is an individual and within settings there are different circumstances.

The Children and Families Act 2014 came into effect from 1 September 2014. With this new legislation comes change for children and young people with additional needs, their parents and carers. There are 6 broad areas that are key to providing an effective service for children and young people.

graduated response

The Graduated Approach enables the right level of intervention and support when needed.

Following this model the child /young person has a graduated approach to meet their needs.

Inherent at each level is the Listen Plan Do Review process.

graduated response 2

First Response A child/young person has been assessed and monitored within the educational setting a document has been produced of support which has been planned, implemented and reviewed and evaluated. If no progress has been made further interventions need to be put into place. This is an educational setting intervention and does not need formal consent of parents. However, the involvement of parents/carers and the child /young person is an intrinsic part of the new legislation so open conversations are essential.

First Response provides a starting point to utilise interventions and services within each setting e.g. Quality First Teaching, individual support, group support, literacy schemes etc. (COP 6.15). The first response document may include what is important to the child /young person, their hopes and dreams, and what helps them and doesn’t help them. This is a simple action plan (similar to an Individual Education Plan). It can be written in any setting by a key professional to create an individual plan with agreed outcomes in order to meet a child or young person’s identified additional needs.

A review of the plan should be completed at least termly and may identify that the child /young person is not making expected progress. At this point a move to a higher level of intervention may be appropriate.

NB: Quality First Teaching is required at each stage.

SEN Support requires early identification of additional needs associated with learning, health, emotional wellbeing, social inclusion, care, communication. As soon as a child or young person is identified with additional needs, or as not making expected progress, the main person within the school or setting involved with the child or young person would meet with the child or young person and his/her parents /carers to complete a working document. This working document will identify the needs, agreed outcomes and support required to reduce the barriers to learning. Parental consent is required at this point. COP 6.43 pg. 100.

Regular reviewing of this working document should be carried out to assess the effectiveness of the interventions for the child/young person.

If at the review stage the child/young person is not making expected progress in spite of the support package currently in place a move to a higher level of intervention may be appropriate.

At this stage SEN Support will require assessment and intervention from different agencies to ensure that additional professional advice and support planning can be brought together into one single working document. Parental consent is required at this point.

The information from this working document will be needed to inform a request for an Education, Health and Care Needs Assessment (EHCNA). The working document should be reviewed at least termly. COP 6.65

If after review the child /young person is not making expected progress, a higher level of support may be required. A request for an Education, Health and Care Needs Assessment (EHCNA) should be submitted to the Local Authority, with supporting evidence.

NB: Quality first teaching is required at each stage

• School should meet parents at least 3 times a year. (COP 6.64-6.71)
• Schools MUST provide an annual report for parents on their child’s progress.
• Pupils’ views should be included in these discussions.
• A record of the outcomes, action and support agreed through the discussion should be kept and shared with all appropriate school staff.
• This should be shared with parents.
• Early Years settings should review the outcomes every 3 – 6 months.
• Post 16 placements should review in accordance with 7.13 of the code of practice.

Considering an Education Health and Care Needs Assessment

If you are considering making a request for an Education, Health and Care Needs Assessment:

For children aged 0 – 5 settings and schools are able to contact the Early Years Qualified Teachers, who are based within Children’s Specialist Service. They are able to provide guidance and support in the consideration of whether to make a request for an Education, Health and Care Needs Assessment (EHCNA) and the completion of the request paperwork.

For children / young people 5-25yrs it is advisable to contact Children’s Specialist Service Team for advice.

For all assessments the following applies:
• You may need to contact a particular service that has not been engaged with already, but that will be able to further support the child or young person.
• You may need to liaise with other professionals to suggest a different approach that may yield the desired outcomes and review in a set period of time.
• You will need to collate all evidence, which includes views from the child, young person and family in order to make a request.

The Education, Health and Care Plan Assessment process

Requesting an Education, Health and Care Needs Assessment

• Check evidence and funding
• The initial stage of the process is the application for an Education, Health and Care Needs Assessment.
• Please use the Telford and Wrekin ‘Request for Education Health and Care Needs Assessment ‘(EHCNA) paperwork which can be found online at www.telford.gov.uk/SEND
• You must ensure that evidence of the interventions already implemented can be demonstrated with clear impact for the child/young person.
• It is important that the request form is accompanied by ALL the evidence required as identified in the guidance.
• The EHC process should take a maximum of 20 weeks. See below.
• This is broken down into the following stages

Process What Happens? Timescales for LA Weeks
Request for EHCNA Setting, parent/carer/young person complete the EHCNA forms and send to LA with as much supporting evidence as possible. On receipt of a complete request - 6 weeks to consider evidence for assessment. 0-6 weeks
Assessment agreed/declined If agreed, requests from LA to professionals for assessment. If declined letter to setting/parent 6 weeks to request, receive and compile reports. 6-12 weeks
Reports/evidence analysed Reports and assessments received back from education, health and social care professionals. The CSS Coordinator will obtain child and parent's views from the most appropriate agency currently working with the family. 4 weeks to compile evidence and decide if a plan is needed or not. 12-16 weeks
EHC plan drafted

SEND Officer writes a draft plan from the reports and assessments received. Draft is sent out to parents.

Meet with parents if requested to discuss contents of the plan, including parents' choice in school.
The placement will not be named at this stage.

 2 weeks to write draft plan

If required parents/professionals can contact the CSS Coordinator to arrange a meeting with the SEND Officer 

16-18 weeks
EHC plan finalised SEND Officer will consult with Parents'  choice of school (and others as appropriate) on their ability to make the provision detailed in the plan and then the plan is finalised and include the placement.
Parent/carers have appeal rights at this point. 

2 weeks to finalise

The decision to name the school in the plan is an LA decision. Whilst consultation with the school over meeting the needs is important, it is the LA's responsibility to name the school within the 20 week timescale. 

18-20 weeks

The statutory process begins when a request has been received by the Local Authority from:

• The Parents or Carers of a child or young person
• A Young Person over the age of 16 years
• A person acting on behalf of an education provider (ideally with parental permission)

REVIEW OF AN EHC PLAN

   Review must take place every 12 months as a minimum  

Review must be held within 12 months of the date of the EHC plan being issued or within 12 months of the date of any previous review.

For a child under 5 the reviews should be held every three to six months 

   Seeking advice The school/institution must seek advice and information from all parties prior to the meeting  All advice and information sent to all invitees at least 2 weeks before the meeting
Week 1  Invitations to review 

If applicable the following people must be invited

  • child's parents or young person
  • school/institution representative
  • health service representative
  • local authority SEN officer
  • local authority social care representative 

At least 2 weeks notice of the date of the meeting provided to all invitees
Week 2      
Week 3 Review meeting 

Review must focus on progress towards achieving outcomes specified in the EHC plan.
Review must consider whether outcomes and supporting targets remain appropriate

 
Week 4      
Week 5 A report of the meeting must be received The school/institution must send a report of the meeting to everyone invited within 2 weeks of the meeting taking place The report must set out recommendations for any amendments to the EHC plan
Week 6      
Week 7  Notification of decision/amendment notice The local authority must decide whether it proposes to keep, amend or cease the plan.
The local authority notifies the child's parent of young person of the local authority decision.
If the local authority notifies the child's parent or young person they have decided not to amend or to cease the plan they must notify the child's parent or young person of their rights of appeal and the time limits for doing so.
Within 4 weeks of the review meeting (and within 12 months of the date of the EHC plan being issued or of the date of any previous review)

Week 8
Week 9
Week 10
Week 11
Week_12

Local authority amends the plan    
Week 13 Local authority amends the plan The local authority must send the child's parent or young person a copy of the existing plan and an accompanying notice of the proposed amendments including any evidence to support the proposed changes. The parent or young person has 15 calendar days to comment or make representations on the planned changes
Week 14      
Week 15 Issue of amended EHC plan This new plan should state that it is an amended version and the date on which it was amended. Additional advice and information should be appended. The following review must be held within 12 months of the date of the original plan or previous review (not the date of the issue of the amended plan). The local authority must issue the amended EHC plan within 8 weeks of the amendment notice

An EHC plan must be reviewed in sufficient time prior to a move between key phases of education. Reviews and amendments must be completed by 15th February.

For young people moving from secondary school to post 16 the review and any amendments must be completed by 31st March.

Who Can Provide Support?

The Educational Psychology Service

• Psychological Advice to the Local Authority as part of the Education, Health and Care Planning process.
• Advice to the Local Authority to inform decision making around placement and provision.
• Advice and support for Children in Care including advice at placement stability meetings.
• Advice as part of the Telford Child Development Centre multi-disciplinary assessment, and Bridge Special Assessment Nursery for children aged 0-5 with complex needs.
• In addition the Educational Psychology Service provides Early Years support in accordance with the Early Years SLA.
• Critical Incident and Bereavement Response Support to schools following the sudden death of a staff member or pupil. In some cases this may include associated specialist casework.
• Multi-agency working as part of the CSS locality teams.
• Specialist advice to the Local Authority to inform Language Class placements.
• Liaison support to Special Schools.
• Strategic, consultancy advice to the Local Authority with regard to new developments and decision making.
• Therapeutic support to the House Number One provision for anxious pupils.
• Advice and assessments for pupils attending Assessment and Intervention Centres.
• Consultancy advice on Autism Spectrum conditions.
• Support for information sharing and triage via Family Connect.
• Early help support for mental health at tiers 1-3.
• Support for children and young people prior to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) referral as part of the CAMHS pathway.
• Advice and support to the Local Authority for young people aged 16-25, including capacity assessments.
• Training and capacity building on psychological issues, such as attachment, to other council teams.
• Support to the Local Authority as part of the Strengthening Families agenda, through a multi-systemic framework.
• Providing the Local Authority with Expert Witness advice for SEND tribunals.

In addition, schools and other settings can purchase a range of services including a range of therapeutic support.

Learning Support Advisory Team (LSAT) and Behaviour Support Advisory Team (BSAT)

The Learning and Behaviour Advisory Teams work with children and young people aged 4 to 18, teaching assistants and school support workers, teachers, and senior leadership staff. LSAT offer:

• Learning assessments and advice
• Access arrangements
• Observations, advice and support for children and young people with SEND
• Challenging behaviours and/or emotional needs
• A wide variety of courses, CPD and conferences in the area of SEND and behaviour, along with in school group interventions to support settings in encouraging and improving learning behaviour.
• Preparation for HLTA and Level 5 Leadership in conjunction with Best Practice Network
• MAPA training for Telford & Wrekin schools
• Nurture Group Network package.

The advisory services (LSAT and BSAT) are traded with the Local Authority schools, non Local Authority schools and other agencies who may wish to access the service.

Inclusion mentor support for individual pupils can be accessed through Fair Access Panel - FAP (Head Teachers and LA Officers) as a Core Service. Group interventions are accessed via the traded service.

Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS)

CAMHS is a multidisciplinary community based service designed to meet the mental health needs of children 0 to 18 years of age, (including those with learning disability), across Telford.

The teams comprise of Mental Health Practitioners, Social Workers, Psychologists, Nurses, Psychiatrists, Occupational Therapists, Speech and Language Therapists and others.

Depending on the level of identified need there are a number of service delivery options. These may include:

• Offering consultation to other agencies
• Assessments and interventions/treatment where there are concerns about a child's mental health and well being
• Assessment and advice through early intervention teams, schools and special schools for children with learning disabilities
• Individual work with children, young people and their families using a variety of skills to meet the needs of a child and their family
• Responding to psychiatric emergencies
• Specialist behaviour modification is offered for children with learning disabilities who have extremely challenging behaviour.

The people CAMHS see

Children aged 0-18 who are displaying symptoms of mental health problems.

New patients

With the exception of emergency referrals, requests relating to child and adolescent mental health that would previously have been referred to CAMHS will now be co-ordinated at Family Connect 01952 385385. Family Connect is a single point of access service which includes services to support children and young people's emotional health and well being.

Please do not send any referrals for CAMHS to Telford Langley Academy as these will be directed to 'Family Connect' (this may result in a delay).

Families who require CAMHS help should talk to the professionals already involved with their child or their GP if it is not school based and they do not see anyone else or if there is a concern about the child's physical health too.

Child and Family Locality Services (CAFLS)

The most useful children and family support is that which helps families to stabilise and improve their own situation through primary prevention approaches at the earliest time. Children and Family Locality Service (CAFLS) provide local services for families with children aged 0-19 through Children and Family Centres, in a planned approach to ensure resources are targeted where they are most effective.

Children’s Centres are an important statutory service focusing on targeted younger children (0-5) and their families as part of Telford & Wrekin’s Children and Family Locality Services (CAFLS). The core purpose of children’s centres is to improve outcomes for young children and their families and reduce inequalities between families in greatest need and their peers in:

• Child development and school readiness;
• Parenting aspirations and parenting skills; and
• Child and family health and life chances. Children’s Centres Statutory Guidance (2013:7) Children Centres target particular groups to attend, (e.g. additional needs, speech and language delay, challenging behaviour)
• Parents (e.g. Emotional wellbeing, healthy lifestyles, parenting in general)
• Families (e.g. worklessness, social isolation, Citizens Advice Bureau)
• Groups (e.g. teen parents, lone parents, BME groups, dads)

The benefits for families with young children to get involved in Children Centres are huge. These included improved parenting skills, greater knowledge of child development, and increased confidence in parenting and parent-child relationship. The environment and activities provides an opportunity for children to interact with others improved personal, social, and emotional development, as well as improved physical development.

There are a raft of activities and support networks that are linked to Children Centres such as CAB support, employment support, targeted activities for parents and children, volunteering, healthy lifestyle programmes, parenting groups and nursery provision, (2, 3 and 4 year nursery funding advice and support to access).

Children and Family Locality Services also offer family support (0-19) at the family home on a one to one basis for targeted vulnerable families. Our Early Intervention Practitioners offer early help parenting strategies and whole family support by bringing together the right services around the family.

Child and Family Locality services are separated into 3 areas:
• Hadley Castle – 01952 387183
• Lakeside South – 01952 385465 (Lakeside) or 01952 385555 (South)
• The Wrekin – 01952 385577 (The Wrekin) or 01952 388077 (Wrekin View)

Speech and Language Therapy

The Children's Speech and Language Therapy (SALT) Service in Shropshire provides assessment and treatment of speech, language, communication and/or swallowing difficulties for children and young people from birth to 16 years old (or to 19 years if in full time education).

The service is open to referrals from anyone who works with children and young people up to 16 years of age, or 19 if in full time education, and from parents/carers directly.

SALT accepts referrals for children with moderate to severe speech, language or communication needs, or with mild difficulties where parental anxiety is high.

We also work with children with feeding difficulties.

New patients

Referrals to the Speech and Language Therapy team can be made either through a health professional (such as a doctor/ GP) or through a school or early years setting.

Parents or carers may also make self referrals by telephoning Coral House on 01743 450800.
1st May is deadline for school age referrals

Services not provided:

• Elocution and working on accents.
• Dyslexia and helping children to read and write.
• Teaching children how to speak English as an additional language (EAL).
• We do not see older children with behavioural feeding difficulties unless they have been known to us since early childhood.
• Young people aged over 14 with voice disorders should be referred to the SLT voice team at Shropshire and Telford Hospital NHS Trust. Contact 01743 261417.

School Nurse:

School nurses have been commissioned to support schools with the implementation and updating of Health Care Plans. Namely liaising with the relevant/identified health professionals to confirm parental interpretation of their child’s health care needs are accurate e.g. diagnosis, treatment, medication etc. For more information on school nurses visit: 
Shropshire Community Health

Occupational Therapy

The role of the occupational therapist is to enable children and young people to function to the best of their ability. Occupational Therapists provide advice for children whose ability to carry out functional skills is compromised.

People who work for the team have two main roles:

Occupational Therapists who carry out assessments and provide advice.
Occupational Therapy Technical Instructors who provide support, training and deliver therapy programmes to school and parents, under the supervision of Occupational Therapists.

This service is provided for the whole of Shropshire County, including Telford and Wrekin residents.

The service is available for children aged between 0-18 (19 years in full time education) who are registered with a GP within either Shropshire or Telford and Wrekin geographical boundaries. The service is offered to all children and young people regardless of ethnic, cultural, spiritual, gender, and disability backgrounds.

New patients

There is an open referral system from parents, school or any other professional with parents’ consent for children between the ages of 0 to 18.

For the referral form visit Shropshire Community Health

Services not provided:

• Equipment For Home;
• Adaptations Of The Home Environment
• Assessment For Dyslexia Or Services For Adults.
• The service does not deal with referrals for wheelchairs.
• Physiotherapy
• Relateen
• Inclusion mentors

Sensory Inclusion Service

The Sensory Inclusion Service (SIS) supports children and young people with hearing and/or visual difficulties and their families. The aim is to provide a wide range of support to ensure children and young people have a good quality of life, achieve their academic potential and are included in their local community.

The Sensory Inclusion Service offers a wide range of services:

• Supporting families/carers.
• Optimising educational outcomes for children and young people.
• Acting as an advocate for children and young people with hearing impairment or visual impairment and their families/carers.
• Multi-agency work to ensure seamless service delivery.
• Promoting inclusion for children and young people.
• Delivering highly specialised services to children and young people with single or dual sensory impairment.
• Provision of visual services including mobility, social inclusion services and the teaching of specialist skills such as Braille and touch-typing.
• Provision of audiological services.
• Assessment and ongoing monitoring of developmental needs of children and young people.
• Provision of professional development opportunities for settings and school based staff and colleagues from other agencies on all aspects of hearing and visual impairment.

For more information visit:
Sensory Inclusion Service

Portage

Portage is a service which helps meet the special educational needs of pre-school children whose development is delayed. It helps parents teach their children new skills at home under the direction of the Portage Home Visitor. The scheme specifies particular teaching techniques and curriculum of skills to be learnt. Children are referred directly to the Portage Service usually by the teams of specialists based at the Child Development Centre, Royal Shrewsbury Hospital and the Telford Children's Development Centre, at Stepping Stones.

For more information visit: Portage

Exclusions

Information about exclusion

Schools must adhere to the ‘Exclusion from Maintained schools, Academies and pupil referral units in England’, a guide for those with legal responsibilities in relation to exclusion, published in 2012. Head teachers should consider the exclusion of children with Special Educational Needs under the same guidance. A disproportionate number of pupils are excluded each year who have an identified Special Educational Need. This means that a pupil with SEND is more likely to be excluded than another non SEND pupil.  

All schools should have in place a behaviour policy and appropriate behaviour management strategies which underpin high quality teaching and learning. Disruptive behaviour can be an indication of unmet needs. Before considering an exclusion it would be expected that the school will have tried all other possible strategies to avoid an exclusion, particularly so in the case of children with special needs. A school cannot send a pupil home for disciplinary reasons, even with the parents or carers consent, without formally excluding the pupil. This is an unofficial or illegal exclusion, sometimes referred to as a grey exclusion.

Schools can either exclude a pupil for a fixed term period of time or permanently exclude them. Schools can additionally exclude a pupil for lunchtimes. Should parents/carers decide to take their child home for lunchtime this is not a formal exclusion as it is parental preference to do so. If a pupil is excluded for lunchtime this is equates to a half day exclusion (1 session) for statistical purposes.

Schools can consider exclusion for issues related to behaviour outside the school gates. This is a matter for the Headteacher and should be in accordance with the schools behaviour policy.

The Decision to Exclude

Only the Headteacher can make the decision to exclude a pupil from the school. All decisions to exclude a pupil should be lawful, rational, reasonable fair and proportionate. In making the decision to exclude the Headteacher should apply the civil standard of proof, i.e. ‘On the balance of probabilities.’ Excluded pupils should be encouraged and enabled to participate in all stages of the exclusion process.

When making the decision to exclude as a result of a specific incident the Headteacher will need to be satisfied that the incident was not a result of the pupils SEND. The Headteacher will also need to be satisfied that there were no reasonable adjustments to the schools policies and practices which might have prevented the incident. When considering exclusion it would be unlawful to treat a pupil less favourably when compared to his peers for a reason associated with a Special Educational Need or Disability.

It is important to remember that when a pupil is excluded from school they are not excluded from education. There is a legal requirement for full time, supervised education to be arranged on the 6th day of a pupils’ exclusion. For a fixed term exclusion of more than 5 days it is the schools responsibility to arrange this full time supervised educational provision. The school will need to satisfy itself that the interim provision it has arranged meets the needs and provisions set out within the pupils EHCP or Statement that any additional support or equipment that is required is provided.

For permanently excluded pupils the Local Authority will arrange provision commencing on the 6th day of the permanent exclusion.

It is unlawful to exclude (or to increase the length or severity of an exclusion) for a non-disciplinary reason. It would be unlawful for example to exclude a pupil on the grounds that the school felt it was not able to meet a pupils needs, for the action of a pupils parents or the failure of a pupil to meet specific conditions before they are reinstated. Pupils who repeatedly disobey their teachers academic instructions could, however, be subject to exclusion.

Exclusion of children with Statements / EHCPs

Headteachers should as far as possible avoid permanently excluding a pupil with an Education Health and Care plan / Statement. Where a school identifies a pupil with SEND is at serious risk of disaffection or permanent exclusion an interim or emergency SEN review should be called as a matter of urgency. It will be possible to consider the pupil’s changing needs and recommend amendments to the plan as an alternative to the pupil being excluded. The request may be made that the Local Authority amends the Plan to name an alternative educational provider or that an increased level of support be considered to further support pupil. Where a pupil is permanently excluded it is the responsibility of the Local Authority to arrange this provision on the 6th day of the permanent exclusion. Arranging full time and suitable education for a pupil with an EHCP will, however, pose additional challenges.

Returning From an Exclusion

Once a pupil has been excluded it is unlawful to stipulate that certain requirements or conditions need to be met as a condition of return or before reinstatement. E.g. the pupil must undergo a particular assessment or commence a specific course or treatment.

Governing Bodies duties to consider an exclusion and Independent Review Panels

The statutory guidance sets out when a Governing Body is expected to consider the Headteachers decision to exclude a pupil. When establishing the facts in relation to an exclusion decision the governing body must apply the civil standard of proof; i.e. ‘on the balance of probabilities’ it is more likely than not that a fact is true rather than the criminal standard of ‘beyond reasonable doubt’.

In the light of their consideration, the governing body can either:

  • uphold an exclusion; or 

  • direct reinstatement of the pupil immediately or on a particular date.

Where reinstatement is not practical because for example, the pupil has already returned to school following the expiry of a fixed period exclusion or the parents make clear they do not want their child reinstated, the governing body must, still consider whether the Headteacher's decision to exclude the child was justified based on the evidence.

The governing body may delegate their functions to a sub committee of at least 3 members. In considering the decision to permanently exclude a pupil the Governing Body may decide to uphold the decision of the Headteacher or to reinstate the pupil.

When considering the reinstatement of an excluded pupil the Governing Body must consider the interests and circumstances of the excluded pupil, including the circumstances in which the pupil was excluded, and have regard to the interests of other pupils and people working at the school.

Following the Pupil Disciplinary Committee decision parents have the right to request that the Local Authority (if the pupil is registered at a maintained school) or the relevant Academy Trust) if the pupils attends an Academy to arrange an Independent Review Panel (IRP). If a pupil has SEND the Local Authority or Academy trust must appoint an SEN expert to attend that panel. Parents have a right to request the attendance of an ‘SEN expert’ at a review, regardless of whether the school recognises that their child has SEN or that this is necessary.

All partners will endeavour to avoid exclusion by:

• Early identification of pupils’ learning needs and behavioural difficulties, including effective liaison between schools;
• Ensuring that, as far as possible, a curriculum appropriate to the needs and learning styles of at risk pupils is planned and delivered;
• Ensuring that all staff have a shared understanding of the school’s behaviour policies and procedures and receive the training necessary to apply them in both teaching and non-teaching situations;
• Establishing an ethos, curriculum, policies and routines in which pupils can learn and model good behaviour and, particularly, in which conflict is avoided;
• Tackling persistent low level disruption;
• Ensuring that all pupils and parents/carers are very clear about the school’s expectations in relation to behaviour.

Specialist Provision

Placement at an Assessment and Intervention Centre (The Linden Centre (KS1/2); The Scott Centre (KS3) or Kickstart (KS4) can only be accessed through a referral to the Fair Access Panel (FAP).

As assessment and intervention programme is implemented and then followed by supported reintegration to their own school or have a different educational setting.

• It is the responsibility of the Lead Teacher at The Linden Centre; the Lead Teacher at The Scott Centre or the Head of School at Kickstart (or their representative) to liaise with the school to negotiate the arrangements for the assessment and intervention programme.

• The student will remain on roll at the referring school for the period of intervention, during this time the student will be dual registered, with the intervention and assessment centre registering as a ‘guest’.

• The student will remain in their home school for half of the timetable; this should be provision in school not a modified timetable.

• It is the responsibility of the Lead Teacher at The Linden Centre; the Lead Teacher at The Scott Centre or the Head of School at Kickstart (or their representative) to liaise with the school and the parents / carers to arrange visits and a support package.

• The referring school should identify a named person, e.g. pastoral head, tutor or teaching assistant, who will provide support for the pupil/family and be a key figure throughout the intervention period.

• The referring school should do everything possible to make the respite work successfully, including careful liaison with the Group Manager for Early Intervention. It is strongly advised that a transition TAC meeting is held at both the start and towards the end of the intervention.

• A key element of the intervention programmes will be regular assessments of behaviour and attitudes to ensure pupils are ready for return to school.

• When the pupil is believed ready for reintegration to school the Lead Teacher at The Linden or Scott Centre or the Head of School at Kickstart (or their representative) will liaise with the school and the parents / carers to arrange visits and a supported reintegration package.

• The duration of any period of intervention should be agreed in advance, either by recommendation from FAP or agreement between the intervention and assessment centre Head and the Referring Head. The end date of this period of intervention should be recorded by the LA Transport and Inclusion Officer. Only in exceptional circumstances, where this is in the best interests of the student, and with the agreement of all parties, should this period of intervention be extended. Any extension should be notified, by the Head, to the LA Transport and Inclusion Officer.

• It is the responsibility of the referring school to ensure that the student re-starts after the agreed period of intervention. Any refusal to receive the student back will result in a charge being levied on the referring school of £100 per day to cover the cost of additional provision.

Telford & Wrekin Student Engagement Programme (SEP)

A cost is payable for each provision (day rate). The Head of Student Engagement Programme can provide details of these costs.

Transport costs to and from the provision venues is the responsibility of the home school.
Attendance, tracking and assessment information for all Student Engagement Programme provisions is administered through Collaborative Learning Manager (CLM).

Contact: louise.bartholomew@telford.gov.uk

SEP - AFC Study Centre and Sutton Hill Youth Centre

Part time provision

Programmes for KS4 pupils for whom engagement with mainstream school provision is difficult.
 Curriculum:

• English, Maths, ICT – Functional skills (E3 – L2)
• OCN Awards at Entry Level and Level 1
• Personal development
• Project based learning
• 1:1 mentoring

There is a strong emphasis on developing the skills, attitudes and competences required for progression into work placed training or further learning. New this year…..

Year 9 Provision

Working one day a week with students at AFC Telford to provide a balanced and supported provision for engaging Year 9 students in learning out of school.

SEP – House No. 4

Part time provision

Programmes for KS3/4 pupils who are at risk of exclusion. Often the YP will demonstrate challenging behaviours in school which present a barrier to learning. Curriculum:

• Personalised mentoring / therapeutic programme.
• Preparation towards Functional Skills and OCN Awards at Entry Level and Level 1
• Personal development

The intervention focuses on building self-esteem and resilience in the YP. The aim is to re-engage learners into formal learning and help them to progress. Some of the work is of a therapeutic nature delivered by trained youth workers through 1:1 and small group work.

SEP - House No.1

Part time provision

Programme for KS3/4 pupils who display anxiety around school attendance. Referral is through FAP, EP and SEN/Complex needs officers following CAHMS intervention. FAP and the placement panel will be facilitating the allocation of places.

Curriculum:

• Highly individualised programmes with input from education, SEN and EP services.
• English, Maths, ICT – Functional Skills
• Thematic learning projects
• Therapeutic intervention.

The aim of this provision is to equip the learner with the resilience and coping strategies that will enable them to successfully re-engage with a mainstream school setting.

Children In Care

All looked after children should have a Personal Education Plan (PEP) which is part of the child’s care plan.

The Personal Education Plan (PEP) allows the social worker, residential staff/carer and Designated Teacher at the child's school or, where they have no school place, the Local Authority representative, in conjunction with the child, to set out what needs to happen to meet the educational needs.

All of those involved in the PEP process should involve the child (according to understanding and ability) and, where appropriate, the parent and/or relevant family member at all stages.

The PEP is an evolving record, and arrangements for the flow of information to develop, review and update the PEP should be in place to ensure the Virtual School Head, Designated Teacher, carer and, where appropriate, child and parent have a copy of the latest version of the document.

The Social Worker should make arrangements for the PEP to be reviewed each school term. All subsequent PEP’s should, as far as possible, correspond with the Looked After Review cycle.

The statement or EHC Plan works in harmony with his or her care plan and PEP to tell a coherent and comprehensive story of how the child’s needs are being met. Professionals should consider how the statement/EHC Plan adds to information about how education, health and care needs will be met without the need to duplicate unnecessarily the information that is already part of the child’s care plan.

It is essential to ensure that the Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP) and the Personal Education Plan (PEP) work in harmony with each other to ensure appropriate support for the young person is coherent. It is therefore desirable to hold the Annual Review for the EHCP alongside one of the termly PEP review meetings.

The Social Worker has two roles to play in the development of an Education, Health and Care Plan. The first of these roles is to contribute to this plan to ensure it encapsulates the child’s care needs. The second role of the Social Worker is as ‘Corporate Parent’ and as such they should contribute to the parental section of the plan, liaising, where appropriate with the foster carers.

The stability of an education placement is crucial for Children in Care and particularly those with Education, Health and Care Plans. In planning educational provision, the following principles should apply:

• educational provision should mean a full-time place
• schools judged by Ofsted to be ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’ should be prioritised for looked after children in need of a new school. Unless there are exceptional evidence-based reasons, looked after children should never be placed in a school judged by Ofsted to be ‘inadequate” “requires improvement” or “special measures”.
• the choice of the education setting should be based on what any good parent would want for their child. It should be based on evidence that the setting can meet the educational needs and help them make the maximum progress.
• the child’s wishes and feelings should be taken into account and the suitability of the education setting tested by arranging an informal visit with the child. Where a looked-after child would benefit from attending a residential school, either in the state or independent sector, VSHs and social workers should be proactive in considering this option. This decision is usually based on the care placement needs and the residential school’s ability to meet these needs

A change of school at any time needs the agreement of the relevant local authority which is maintaining the Education, Health and Care Plan. The Local Authority should be informed as soon as possible that a change of educational setting is required for the child/young person as in some cases, it can take some time to identify an appropriate setting. The child’s social worker should be aware of the current position with regard to the Plan, including any additional support provided and by whom.

Special Educational Settings

Short Guide:

Name of educational setting Age range Location Specialism
 Haughton School   5-11 years  Madeley  Moderate Leaning Difficulties and complex needs in the areas of autism, communication and interaction, social emotional and mental health, sensory or physical difficulties. (as the children cannot attend Haughton unless they have a moderate learning difficulty)
 The DEN  7-11 years  Madeley Social, emotional and mental health
 The Bridge School  5-16 years  Hadley  Complex and significant needs in the area of cognition and learning. (Severe Learning difficulties or profound or multiple learning difficulties) Pupils may also have associated needs in the areas of social, emotional and mental health needs and communication and interaction (Autistic Spectrum Disorder and or Speech and language difficulties) In addition pupils may have sensory and/or physical difficulties 
 The Bridge Assessment Nursery  2-5 years  Hadley Complex and significant needs in the area of cognition and learning. (severe Learning difficulties or profound or multiple learning difficutlies) Pupils may also have associated needs in the areas of social, emotional and mental health needs and communication and interaction (Autistic Spectrum Disorder and or Speech and language difficulties) In addition pupils may have sensory and/or physical difficulties 

 Telford College of Arts and Technology (TCAT)

The Willow Tree Centre

 16-19 years  Wellington Specialist provision within TCAT. Students will have complex and significant needs in the area of cognition and learning. (Severe Learning difficulties or profound or multiple learning difficulties) Pupils may also have associated needs in the areas of social, emotional and mental health needs and communication and interaction (Autistic Spectrum Disorder and or Speech and language difficulties in addition pupils may have sensory and/or physical difficulties.

 Southall School

 11-16 years  Dawley Complex needs (for example Moderate leaning difficulties alongside Autistic Spectrum Disorder, Speech & Language difficulties etc) 
 Queensway HLC  11-16 years  Hadley Autistic Spectrum Condition diagnosis leading to high anxiety, social and communicational needs which are displayed as behavioural difficulties.
 Telford College of Arts and Technology (TCAT)

KS5 at Queensway HLC
 16-18 years  Hadley Autistic Spectrum Disorder leading to social, emotional and mental health needs
 Mount Gilbert  11-16 years  Dawley Social, emotional and mental health 

Detailed Guide:

Haughton School

This is a maintained day special school for children aged rising 5-11 years with complex cognition and learning needs often with additional special educational needs. Pupils will be provided with an appropriately paced and differentiated curriculum. The school is accessible for wheelchair users and is on one level.

The school currently has capacity for 100 pupils. Occasionally the school may be required to take additional pupils.

Staffing levels are enhanced so that pupils are usually taught in classes of up to 15 with a teacher and at least two teaching assistants and an appropriate number of additional teaching assistants to meet the needs of the class group.

The school receives advice from a range of health professionals in order to meet the needs of the Pupils.

The Den

The Den is a maintained day special school provision, based at Haughton School, for children aged rising 5 – 11 years. Pupil will be provided with an appropriately paced and differentiated curriculum. The school is accessible for wheelchair users and is on one level.

The school currently has places for up to 6 pupils.

Staffing levels are enhanced so that pupils are taught in a single class of up to 6 with a teacher and three teaching assistants.

A programme of therapeutic support will also be available.

Mount Gilbert

This is a maintained day special school for pupils aged 11-16 years with complex social, emotional and mental health needs. Pupils will be provided with an appropriately paced and differentiated curriculum. The school is accessible for wheelchair users and is on one level.

The school currently has places for 48 pupils.

Staffing levels are enhanced so that pupils are taught in classes of up to 8 with a teacher and usually a teaching assistant.

Occasionally the school may be required to take additional pupils

Southall School

This is a maintained day special school for children aged rising 11-16years with complex cognition and learning needs often with additional special educational needs. Pupil will be provided with an appropriately paced and differentiated curriculum. The school is accessible for wheelchair users and is on one level.

The school currently has places for 160 pupils. Occasionally the school may be required to take additional pupils.

Staffing levels are enhanced so that pupils are usually taught in classes of up to 15 with a teacher and at least one teaching assistant and an appropriate number of additional teaching assistants to meet the needs of the class group.

The school receives advice from a range of health professionals in order to meet the needs of the students.

The Bridge School

This is a maintained day special school for children aged rising 5-16 years with complex and severe cognition and learning needs often with additional special educational needs. Children will be provided with an appropriately paced and differentiated curriculum. The school also runs a specialist nursery of 40 part time placements for children aged from rising 2 to 5 years old and admissions to this provision are within the Bridge Assessment Nursery Policy.

The school is accessible for wheelchair users and is on one level.

The school currently has places for 155 pupils. Occasionally the school may be required to take additional pupils.

Staffing levels are enhanced so that pupils are usually taught in classes of up to 10 with a teacher and at least one level 3 teaching assistant and an appropriate number of additional teaching assistants to meet the needs of the class group.

The school receives advice from a range of health professionals in order to meet the needs of the students as assessed by the appropriate professionals.

Queensway HLC

This is a maintained day specialist provision for children aged 10 – 16 years who have been formally diagnosed by CAMHS with an autistic spectrum condition where levels of anxiety, communication or social interaction difficulties are displayed as behavioural difficulties. Additionally an Educational Psychologist assessment that a mainstream secondary is not appropriate and a smaller quieter environment is more appropriate, is necessary. Children will be provided with an appropriately paced and differentiated curriculum.

A small one year Post 16 provision is also available to support autistic students’ transition into further education.

The school is accessible for wheelchair users and is on one level. The provision has places for 60 pupils (Sept 2016). Pupils are ideally taught in classes of up to eight with a teacher and teaching assistant. Occasionally the school may be required to take additional pupils.

A programme of therapeutic support may also be available.

Management of Health Care Needs and Medication

There are many students in our nurseries / schools and colleges that have a wide range of medical needs that may demand intense personal care or careful management of medicine. These students do not necessarily require an EHC Plan.

Present statutory guidance and non-statutory advice serves the purpose of highlighting the following key points:

• Pupils at school with medical conditions should be properly supported so that they have full access to education, including school trips and physical education.
• Governing bodies must ensure that arrangements are in place in schools to support pupils at school with medical conditions.
• Please note that an Individual Health Care Plan (IHCP) is different to an EHCP
• Governing bodies should ensure that school leaders consult health and social care professionals, pupils and parents/carers to ensure that the needs of children with medical conditions are effectively supported. Presently the most current advice and guidance can be found at:

Statutory guidance on supporting pupils at school with medical conditions

In essence nurseries / schools and colleges must ensure that children and young people with medical needs are supported and fully included. Governing bodies should ensure that schools develop policies, for supporting pupils with medical conditions, that are reviewed regularly and readily accessible to parents / carers and school staff. Governing bodies should ensure that policies include details on how the school policy will be implemented effectively, including a named person who has overall responsibility for policy implementation.

The Role of Individual Healthcare Plans (Different from an EHCP)

Individual healthcare plans should be drawn up for students with medical needs. These will range in the level of detail according to the severity of need but will be constructed by a designated member of staff, school nurse or other healthcare professional who is involved with the child or young person. The plan should be informed by the range of professionals involved and look to include such information as the medical condition and its triggers, symptoms and expected responses from those who are to be in contact with the child or young person with the medical need.
The governing body should ensure that plans are reviewed at least annually or earlier if the child’s needs change. They should be developed in the context of assessing and managing risks to the child’s education, health and social well-being and to minimise disruption. Where the child has a special educational need, the individual healthcare plan should be linked to the child’s statement or EHC plan where they have one.

Managing Medicines on School Premises

The governing body should ensure that policies are clear about the procedures to be followed for managing medicines. Policies should reflect information such as:

• medicines should only be administered at school when it would be detrimental to a child’s health or school attendance not to do so
• no child under 16 should be given prescription or non- prescription medicine without written parental consent except in exceptional circumstances such as where the child or young person has been prescribed medicine without the knowledge of the parent/guardian
• all medicines should be stored safely but be available to the child or young person immediately
• settings should maintain up to date record keeping in relation to all medicines administered
• Governing bodies should ensure that policies set out what should happen in an emergency situation both in general terms but where a child or young person has an individual healthcare plan a specific response of what to do in an emergency specifically related to the individual concerned.

School Finance / SEN Funding Arrangements

All mainstream schools are provided with resources to support those with additional needs, including pupils with SEN and disabilities. Most of these resources are determined by a local funding formula, discussed with the local schools forum, which is also applied to local academies. School and academy sixth forms receive an allocation based on a national funding formula.

Schools have an amount identified within their overall budget, called the notional SEN budget. This is not a ring-fenced amount, and it is for the school to provide high quality appropriate support from the whole of its budget.

It is for schools, as part of their normal budget planning, to determine their approach to using their resources to support the progress of pupils with SEND. The SENCO, head teacher and governing body or proprietor should establish a clear picture of the resources that are available to the school. They should consider their strategic approach to meeting SEN in the context of the total resources available, including any resources targeted at particular groups, such as the pupil premium.

This will enable schools to provide a clear description of the types of special educational provision they normally provide and will help parents / carers and others to understand what they can normally expect the school to provide for pupils with SEND.

Schools are not expected to meet the full costs of more expensive special educational provision from their core funding. They are expected to provide additional support which costs up to a nationally prescribed threshold per pupil per year. The responsible local authority, usually the authority where the child or young person lives, should provide additional top-up funding where the cost of the special educational provision required to meet the needs of an individual pupil exceeds the nationally prescribed threshold.

The SEN funding is made up of three parts:

• Element 1 – standard placement funding.
• Element 2 – an amount of money from the schools budget to provide extra individual help for lower level needs.
• Element 3 – the amount of money provided by the Local Authority to meet higher level individual needs above Element 2.

Element 3 funding may be available for use as a personal budget. This can only be included with the agreement of the school or college. It is not always possible for a school or college to release element 3 funding into a personal budget because it may be part of the existing overall provision. At the discretion of the head teacher/college principal a personal budget could also include all/parts of element 2 funding.

SEN Personal Budgets Explained

• From September 2014, all children and young people assessed as needing, or with an Educational Health and Care Plan have the option of an SEN Personal Budget
• An SEN Personal Budget is funding available to achieve educational outcomes in an EHCP that cannot be met from existing resources
• SEN Personal Budgets are optional for parents / carers and young people but the Local Authority is under a duty to prepare a budget when requested.

Many children and young people with special educational needs or a disability attend school or college and are supported by the resources available there and do not need any additional support. The school or college should make it clear what additional support they provide on their local offer and within their SEN report.

The money used to pay for this is referred to as “High Needs Block” funding and might be used instead to provide a personal budget.

It is also possible for a school or college to agree to release some funding to contribute towards the family or young person having a personal budget, where it is clear that this will help to meet the needs of the child/young person and achieve the desired outcomes. For example, where part of the plan for the young person is that they will access work experience, the school could agree to release some of the funding into the budget, so that the family could employ a direct payment worker to support this.

However, families will not be able to access a budget to pay for something the school or college already provides. This may mean that the support available through a Personal Budget will change if their child moves from a mainstream school to a special school as the special school will be providing a higher level of support.

Where the support or service is to be used in a school the head teacher of the school must agree. If they do not the Local Authority cannot make the payment.

Mainstream schools and colleges receive funding to support children and young people.

In SEND specialist placements (commonly special schools, SEN units, additionally resourced centres, special needs colleges, SEN training providers) there is a commissioned place (Element 1 and 2) plus any Element 3 funding the learner needs above that.

Any staff employed by parents/young people to work within a school or college would have to have the school or college permission (usually the head teacher or principal.)

For more information on Personal Budgets visit our Personal Budgets page

Independent Supporters/IASS/Mediation

The Role of Independent Supporters

Independent Support (IS) is a government funded programme to provide additional support to parent and young people during the implementation of the Children and Families Act 2014. Specially trained Independent Supporters will provide support to parent/carers or to young people during the EHC assessment planning process. The support is tailored to the particular needs of families and focuses on:

• Supporting parent/carers and young people to transfer a statement of special educational needs into an EHC Plan
• Helping parent/carers and young people understand the local offer
• Offers a named contact throughout the EHC assessment planning process
• Liaises with a range of agencies with the parent/carer or young person to help gather the information required for an EHC Plan
• Provide information to parent/carers and young people on personal budgets
• Signposting the parent/carer or young person to Information, Advice and Support Service (IASS) when the issue is outside of the remit of the Independent Supporter

Information, Advice and Support Service (IASS)

Previously known as Parent Partnership Service (PPS) IASS provides free, confidential and impartial information, advice and support around Special Educational Needs and Disabilities, including health and social care. This will increase confidence to participate in decisions, empowering parents and young people to take an active role in their child’s or their own education.

All maintained (state) schools have a compulsory duty under section 317 of the Education Act 1996 to ensure that necessary provision is made for pupils with SEND and each local authority has a statutory requirement to provide funding for a Parent Partnership Service (now IASS.)

The overall aim of IASS is to provide a menu of flexible services for parents / carers of children who have SEND, or young people with SEN, in order for them to play an informed role in their child’s or their own education.

Mediation

When does mediation apply?

Mediation is a voluntary process for parents / carers and young people, which can be used if agreement cannot be reached with the Local Authority or Clinical Commissioning Group. It applies where a child’s parent/carer or a young person intends to appeal to the First-Tier Tribunal (Special Educational Needs and Disability) about a decision made by the Local Authority or the content of an EHC Plan.

If a parent/carer or young person wishes to appeal to the First-Tier Tribunal (Special Educational Needs and Disability) they must consider mediation before they can register an appeal with the tribunal.

They do not have to contact a mediation advisor if they only want to appeal to the tribunal about:

•The school or other institution named in the plan
The type of school or other institution specified in the plan
•The fact that the plan does not name a school or other institution

What can be discussed at mediation?

Matters which can be discussed in mediation before going to Tribunal include:

• A decision by the Local Authority not to carry out an EHC needs assessment of re-assessment
• A decision by the Local Authority that it is not necessary to issue an EHC plan following an assessment
• The description of a child or young person’s SEN specified in the EHC plan, the special educational provision specified, the school or other institution or type of school or other institution (such as mainstream school/college) specified in the plan or that no school or institution is specified
• An amendment to the EHC plan
• A decision by the Local Authority not to amend an EHC plan following a review or re-assessment
• A decision by the Local Authority to cease to maintain an EHC plan

The tribunal does not hear appeals about personal budgets but will hear appeals about the special educational provision to which a personal budget may apply.

What happens when a parent/carer or young person has contacted the mediation adviser?

Following a discussion with the mediation adviser the parent/carer or young person can then decide whether mediation is a suitable way forward.

If the parent/carer or young person decides they do not wish to participate in mediation they must obtain a certificate from a mediation adviser to evidence they have been made aware of the process. The certificate should be issued within 3 working days. This certificate can then be sent to Tribunal to register an appeal.

Where parent/carers or young people do decide to proceed with mediation, then a meeting is arranged within 30 calendar days at a neutral, accessible venue.

Any agreements reached during the meeting will be recorded and signed by both parties. The mediator will then produce a certificate within 3 working days of the mediation taking place, regardless of the outcome.

If the mediation does not fully resolve the disagreement and a parent/carer or young person still wishes to appeal to the Tribunal, the certificate will be sent to register the appeal. This should take place within one month of receiving the certificate.

How do parent/carers or young people access disagreement resolution or mediation?

Parents/carers or young people should contact the SEND Officer named in the local authority’s decision letter if they wish to pursue disagreement resolution or mediation.

Detailed information on Independent Supporters, IASS and Mediation listed on the Local Offer.

www.telfordsend.org.uk

Frequently Asked Questions

Useful Contacts

Family Connect – 01952 385385 - familyconnect@telford.gov.uk

Children’s Specialist Service – 01952 383599

Learning Support Advisory Team – 01952 385485

Behaviour Support Advisory Team – 01952 385485

Inclusion Mentors – 01952 385485
https://torch.taw.org.uk/CorporateInformation/LearningBehaviour

FAP – Lorraine.beckwith@telford.gov.uk 01952 380851

Educational Psychology Service – 01952 385216

Attendance Support Team – 01952 385220
attendancesupportteam@telford.gov.uk

The Speech and Language Therapy Team - 01743 450837 

The Occupational Therapy Team - Children’s – OT4kids@shropcom.nhs.uk

01952 567351 (Stepping Stones)

01743 450839 (Coral House)

Sensory Inclusion Services – 01952 385269

School Nurses – 01952 621340 http://www.shropscommunityhealth.nhs.uk/school-nurses-telford

Stepping Stones – 01952 567300

Queensway HLC – 01952 388555 queenswayhlc@taw.org.uk

Southall School – 01952 387600 talk2us@southallschool.com

Haughton School – 01952 387540 haughton.admin@taw.org.uk

The Bridge School – 01952 387108

The Linden Centre – 01952 385601

House No 1 – 01952 388370

The Scott Centre – 01952 385604.

Kickstart – 01952 642541 / 01952 385148 

Nova Training – 01952 243380

Park Lane Centre – 01952 683700

Sutton Hill Children’s Centre – 01952 385465

ICT Support – 01952 383333 

Telford and Wrekin Services For Schools to Support Learners with Additional and Special Educational Needs

T&W C&FS Director
education and corporate parenting jim collins

corporate parenting and inclusion


corporate parenting and inclusion 2
children s safeguarding
children s safeguarding 2

Process Flowchart for EHC Plan

SEND Assessment Guidance

Guidance EHCP Forms